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COMP 211: Principles of Program Design

Instructors:

Prof. Robert "Corky" Cartwright

Staff:

Alina Sbirlea

 

Dr. Stephen Wong

 

Kamal Sharma

 

 

 

Nicholas Coltharp

Lectures:

Duncan Hall (DH) 1075

Time:

MWF 10:00-10:50am

Lab:

Ryon 102

Time:

Tuesday 10:50am-12:05pm

Office Hours:

  • Dr. Cartwright: MWF 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
  • Dr. Wong:   See home page
  • Alina: MWF 11:00 AM -12:00 PM
  • Kamal:  MF 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
  • Nicholas: TR 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

e-mail the entire class: comp211s11 at owlspace-ccm.rice.edu 

e-mail just the staff: comp211 at rice.edu 

Introduction

This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of programming. The focus is on systematic methods for developing robust solutions to computational problems. Students are expected to have experience writing interesting programs in some credible programming language (e.g., Python, Java, Scheme, C#, C++, Visual Basic .NET, PRL, Scheme, Lisp, etc.) but no specific programming expertise is assumed. The course is targeted at potential Computer Science majors but mathematically sophisticated non-majors are welcome. We expect students to be comfortable with high-school mathematics (primarily algebra, mathematical proofs, and induction) and the mathematical rigor and vocabulary of freshman calculus. Success in the course requires a deep interest in the foundations of computer science and software engineering, self-discipline, and a willingness to work with other people on programming projects. Topics covered include functional programming, algebraic data definitions, design recipes for writing functions, procedural abstraction, reduction rules, program refactoring and optimization, object-oriented programming emphasizing dynamic dispatch, OO design patterns, fundamental data structures and algorithms from an OO perspective, simple Grapical User Interfaces (GUIs), and an exposure to the challenges of concurrent computation.

Students will learn the practical skills required to write, test, maintain, and modify programs. Labs and assignments use the Scheme and Java programming languages.

Text For Scheme: How to Design Programs by Felleisen et al. QA76.6 .H697 2001 (Available online; no purchase is necessary.)

DrScheme/DrRacket: Please download and use the DrScheme/DrRacket system available from the Racket download site. To avoid compatibility problems, please make sure you use a Version numbered 5.0.2

Notes for Java: Object-oriented Design

References for Java

  • Principles of Object-Oriented Programming by Zung Nguyen and Stephen Wong. An online self-contained introduction to OOP in Java roughly corresponding to the former Comp 212 course. It is reasonably complete, but still under construction.
  • Design Patterns Lens  - A collection of short descriptions of the design patterns covered in the course.
  • Index to online Java Tutorials by Sun Microsystems The Sun tutorials refer to the full Java language not the Elementary and Intermediate language levels supported by DrJava.Nevertheless, they cover many important language details in depth, such as the complete collection of primitive operators on primitive data types.
  • Java Basics by Fred Swartz is a clearly written traditional introduction to Java that focuses on Java mechanics rather than OO Design. It can be helpful in learning the mechanics of writing full Java code. Please ignore what he says about program design.
  • Java Notes by Fred Swartz is a reasonably comprehensive Java reference that is a good supplement to the official Sun documents.

DrJava: Please download and use the DrJava pedagogic programming environment available from drjava.org. You must install either the Java 5 or Java 6 JDK on your machine for DrJava to work. (Addendum: DrJava releases starting in 2011 can also run using a Java 7 JDK.) If you machine is running some flavor of Windows or Linux, go to the \[Sun Download Site for the Java SE 6.0 (http://java.sun.com/javase/downloads/index.jsp\]). Make sure that you download the JDK not the JRE. If you have a Mac, a Java JDK is available from Apple. In fact, it is part of the standard Mac OS X software package. DrJava will run on either the Apple Java 5.0 or Java 6.0 JDK.

Entrance Survey

Please fill out this survey.

Confirm that You Can Attend Lab

The lab is an essential component of the course. Every student should attend lab on Tuesday 10:50-12:05 in Ryon 102.
If you have a conflict, you probably should drop the course. If you have a conflict, but still want to take the course, please come see Prof. Cartwright or Prof. Wong to evaluate your options.

Computing Environment

All Comp 211 programming assignments will be run and graded on the CLEAR (Linux) educational computing facility. The Ryon 102 lab is equipped with machines connected to the CLEAR network. For instructions on how to use CLEAR, see the CLEAR web page.

Errata

This wiki for Comp 211 is a revision of last year's and may contain a significant number of broken links and typos. If you notice an error in the wiki, please send email to the Comp 211 staff.

Course Schedule

Note that future date schedules are only guidelines. Future homeworks and slides may contain materials from previous Comp 210 and Comp 212 classes. New material will be provided before the corresponding class. There will only be two exams in the course: one given on functional programming during week 7 and one on object-oriented programming given during in the last week of the course. Both are take-home exams. There is no final examination.

 

Day

Date(2011)

Topic

Reading

Lectures

Problems

Due(2011)

Lab

Supplements

1

Mon

Jan 10

Introduction & Scheme Primitives

 

L 1

HW 0

W Jan 12

Lab 0

Pair Programming

2

Wed

Jan 12

Function definitions and conditionals

Read Chs. 1-10

L 2

HW 1

F Jan 21

 

 

3

Fri

Jan 14

Data Definitions & The Design Recipe

Read Chs. 11-13

L 3

 

 

 

 

-

Mon

Jan 17

School Holiday

 

 

 

 

Lab 1

 

4

Wed

Jan 19

Data-directed design

Read Chs. 14-15

L 4

 

 

 

 

5

Fri

Jan 21

Data-directed design: trees

 

L 5

HW 2

Mon Jan 31

 

 

6

Mon

Jan 24

Mutually Referential Data Definitions

Read Chs. 16-17

L 6

 

 

Lab 2

Class Demo

7

Wed

Jan 26

 

Read Ch. 18

L 6

 

 

 

 

8

Fri

Jan 28

Local Definitions and Lexical Scope

Read Chs. 19-20

L 7

 

 

 

 

9

Mon

Jan 31

Functional Abstraction and Polymorphism

Read Chs. 21-22

L 8

HW 3

Mon Feb 7

Lab 3

 

10

Wed

Feb 02

Functions as Values

Read Ch. 24

L 9

 

 

 

 

11

Fri

Feb 04

Lambda the Ultimate

Read Chs. 25-28

L 10

 

 

 

 

12

Mon

Feb 07

Generative Recursion

Study Chs. 25-28

L 11

HW 4

Mon Feb 14

Lab 4

 

13

Wed

Feb 09

Complexity and Accumulators

Read Chs. 29.1-2
Skim Chs. 30-32

L 13

 

 

 

 

14

Fri

Feb 11

Accumulators and Tail Calls

Read Chs. 30-32

L 14

 

 

 

 

15

Mon

Feb 14

Clever Programming With Functions

Review prior readings

L 15

HW 5

Mon Feb 21

Lab 5

210 Exam 1
210 Exam 2
Solution to 12.4.2

16

Wed

Feb 16

Exam Review

Review prior readings

L 16, L 17

 

 

 

 

17

Fri

Feb 18

On to Java

OO Design Notes Ch 1.1-1.4

L 18

 

 

 

 

18

Mon

Feb 21

 

OO Design Notes Ch 1.1-1.4

L 18

HW 6 (Optional)
Exam 1

Mon Mar 07

Lab 6

 

19

Wed

Feb 23

Java Design Recipe

OO Design Notes Ch 1.1-1.4

L 19

 

 

 

IntList
IntListTest

20

Fri

Feb 25

Defining Inductive Data in Java

OO Design Notes Ch 1.5
Tony Hoare: "Null References: The Billion Dollar Mistake"

L 20

 

 

 

 

-

M-F

Feb 28-Mar 4

Spring Break

 

 

 

 

 

 

21

Mon

Mar 07

Static Class Members and the Singleton Pattern

OO Design Notes Ch 1.6

L 21

HW 7

Mon Mar 14

Lab 7

ObjectList
ObjectListTest

22

Wed

Mar 09

Polymorphism and Interfaces

OO Design Notes Ch 1.8

L 22

 

 

 

ComparableList
ComparableListTest

23

Fri

Mar 11

Handling Exceptions and Errors

OO Design Notes Ch 1.9-1.10, 1.12

L 23

 

 

 

 

24

Mon

Mar 14

The Strategy and Visitor Patterns

OO Design Notes Ch 1.9, 1.11

L 24

HW 8

Mon Mar 21

Lab 8

IntList
IntListVisitor
IntListTest

25

Wed

Mar 16

Visitors, Visitors, Vistors ...

OO Design Notes Ch 1.11

L 25

 

 

 

 

26

Fri

Mar 18

Accepting Reality: Full Java

OO Design Notes Ch 1.13

L 26

 

 

 

IntList
IntListTest

27

Mon

Mar 21

 

OO Design Notes Ch. 1.10, 1.13

 

HW 9

Fri Apr 4

Lab 9

List
ListTest

28

Wed

Mar 23

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-

Thurs-Fri

Mar 24-25

School Holiday

 

 

 

 

 

 

29

Mon

Mar 28

Simple Generics in Java

OO Design Notes Ch 1.13.4 (contains advanced material as well)

L 29

 

 

Lab 10

lec29_code.zip  (incl. genList)

30

Wed

Mar 30

Mutation and Bi-Directional Linked Lists

OO Design Notes Ch 1.13

L 30

 

 

 

 

31

Fri

Apr 1

BiLists Continued

OO Design Notes Ch 2.1

L 30

 

 

 

BigBiList
BigBiListTest

32

Mon

Apr 4

Mutable Trees

OO Design Notes Ch 2.1

L 32

HW 10

Wed. Apr 13

Lab 11

TreeMap
TreeMapTest
OOTreeMap
OOTreeMapTest

33

Wed

Apr 6

Mutable Trees

 

L 32

 

 

 

 

34

Fri

Apr 8

Mutable Trees

 

L 32

 

 

 

FunctionalQuicksort

35

Mon

Apr 11

Mutable Trees and OO Data Structure Review

OO Design Notes

L 32

 

 

Lab 12

 

36

Wed

Apr 13

OO Sorting Algorithms

CNX Module on Sorting (incl. insertion and selection sort animations)

L 36

HW 11

Milestone 1: Mon. Apr 18
Milestone 2: Fri. Apr 22

 

Design Patterns Slides
Design Patterns Paper
Sorter Demo

37

Fri

Apr 15

Graphical User Interfaces

 

L 37, 2010

 

 

 

 

38

Mon

Apr 18

Fast Searching and Memoization

 

L 38

 

 

Lab 13

MyHashMap.java
MyHashMapTest.java
BetterMath.java

39

Wed

Apr 20

Fast Sorting Methods

 

L 39

 

 

 

 

40

Fri

Apr 22

Review

 

L 40

 

 

 

 

Grading, Honor Code Policy, Processes and Procedures

Grading will be based on your performance on homeworks (worth 50%) and exams (20% for first exam, and 30% for the second exam).

Take-home exams, which are pledged under the honor code, test your individual understanding and knowledge of the material. Collaboration on exams is strictly forbidden.

We will normally use the OwlSpace Comp 211 Announcements and General Discussion forum to post important announcements and discussions related to the
class, particularly Q&A on class assignments.   The Owlspace e-mail alias to the entire class (see above) will also be used.

Other Mailing Lists:

  • cs-events-l@mailman.rice.edu:
    • Announcements relating to talks and other interesting events hosted by the CS departments.
    • Subscription to this list is optional but highly recommended

Questions

If you have a question about homework – you're not sure what is expected for a given problem, you haven't received feedback from a previous assignment, or you don't understand or agree with the assessment of your work, for example – you can raise the question with a TA in lab or on the class mailing list. It is preferable to send a question out for the whole class to discuss so that everyone can benefit from eachother's contributions as well the responses from the staff.   Please restrict messages sent to only the staff to more sensitive matters that do not warrant viewing by the entire class. If you still don't feel that your concerns have been addressed, you may wish to contact Prof. Cartwright or Prof. Wong directly.

Homeworks:

Homeworks help you verify your understanding of the material and prepare you for the exams. You are encouraged to discuss the homework problems with the instructors and staff. Help from other students, including Comp 211 graduates, is also encouraged (but should be cited), although that does not include giving or receiving complete answers. All homework partners are responsible for knowing all the submitted material. If you fail to understand the homework solutions, you won't succeed on the exams.

Homeworks will generally be handed out on Fridays, and will be due before class the following Friday.

You are expected to work in groups of two.

You may change partners during the semester.

Partners should work together on all aspects of the homework -- all students are expected to contribute equally. You and your partner should hand in exactly one solution.

Late homework will not be accepted with one exception. Every student is allotted 7 slip days. Each whole day or fraction of a day that an assignment is late counts as a slip day. Each student in the pair submitting a late assignment must spend the requisite number of slip days. Since assignments get progressively harder during the semester, we strongly encournage you to hoard your slip days for use near the end of the term.

We recommend that you review the homework guide as you develop your solutions. Review the submission checklist when you turn in your homework. Your work will be graded as documented on the grading page.

Reading: For each lecture, there is associated reading. Students are required to complete the reading before the class associated with this reading.

Other Resources

Additional References

Here is a nice article about the basic approach taken in this course.

More on CS

The New Turing Omnibus, A. K. Dewdney

QA76 .D448 1993

Algorithmics: The Spirit of Computing, David Harel

QA76.9 .A43 H37 2004

Computers Ltd.: What They Really Can't Do, David Harel

QA76.5 .H3575 2000

Great Ideas in Computer Science, Alan W. Biermann

QA76 .B495 1997

Computer Science: An Overview, J. Glenn Brookshear

QA76 .B743 1997

Godel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, Douglas Hofstadter

QA9.8 .H63 1980

Metamagical Themas, Douglas Hofstadter

Q335 .H63 1985

More on Functional Programming

Google's MapReduce

(Online)

The Little Schemer, Friedman & Felleisen

QA76.73 .S34 F75 1996

The Seasoned Schemer, Friedman & Felleisen

QA76.73 .S34 F77 1996

Developing Applications with Objective Caml, Emmanuel Chailloux, Pascal Manoury, and Bruno Pagano

 

The Haskell School of Expression: Learning Functional Programming Through Multimedia, Paul Hudak

QA76.62 H83 2000

More on Object-Oriented Design in Java

Principles of Object-Oriented Programming

The Connexions Curriculum for the former Comp 212 course

The Java Programming Language, Arnold & Gosling

Gosling was the principal designer of Java 1.0

Thinking In Java, Bruce Eckel

The 3rd edition is available free.

Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software, Gamma, Helm, Johnson & Vlissides

The "Bible" of OO software design.

Head First Java, Bert Bates & Kathy Sierra

A fun read while you get introduced to Java and learn how to think like a Java Programmer.

Head First Design Patterns, Freeman & Freeman

An accessible introduction to Design Patterns.

More on Data Structures and Algorithms

Introduction to Algorithms: Book written by Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest. The authoritative reference on algorithms.

Accommodations for Students with Special Needs

Students with disabilities are encouraged to contact me during the first two weeks of class regarding any special needs. Students with disabilities should also contact Disabled Student Services in the Ley Student Center and the Rice Disability Support Services.

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